What California’s Deadly Wildfires Look Like On The Ground

  • info 
California’s Deadly Wildfires

What California’s Deadly Wildfires Look Like On The Ground

California’s Deadly Wildfires
What California’s Deadly Wildfires Look Like On The Ground
Local news reporters, residents, photojournalists, and scientists have been sharing images from the ground on what was left in the fires’ wake. There will be a lot of damage assessment, healing, and rebuilding to do after these tragedies. Here’s what the situation looks like on the ground.

The day before the uncommonly deadly Camp Fire ignited near Chico, California, meteorologists were warning of unprecedented dryness from heat, winds, low humidity, and lack of precipitation. California was a tinderbox.

Since then, the monster fire has ripped through 140,000 acres, laid the town of Paradise (population 26,000) to waste, and destroyed more than 10,000 structures. This makes it the most destructive wildfire California has ever seen. Yet the human toll has been even more stunning: At least 56 people have died in the flames (with over 200 still unaccounted for), making it the single deadliest wildfire in state history.

The dry, windy conditions throughout California mean Southern California has also been at extreme risk for fires. On November 8, the Woolsey Fire sparked in Ventura County and then swept into Los Angeles County, torching a total of 98,300 acres and killing at least three.

Fire experts and climate scientists say the California’s deadly wildfires have certainly been made worse by climate change. “If Northern California had received anywhere near the typical amount of autumn precipitation this year (around 4-5 in. of rain near #CampFire point of origin), explosive fire behavior & stunning tragedy in #Paradise would almost certainly not have occurred,” climate scientist Daniel Swain wrote on Twitter. And the long-term projections for future shifts in precipitation and heat are bleak: The State likely has many more dangerous California’s Deadly Wildfires in store.

“[California’s Deadly Wildfires] will be part of our future … things like this, and worse,’’ Gov. Jerry Brown said at a Sunday press conference. “That’s why it’s so important to take steps to help communities, to do prevention and adaptation.”

Local news reporters, residents, photojournalists, and scientists have been sharing images from the ground on what was left in the fires’ wake. There will be a lot of healing and rebuilding to do after these tragedies. Here’s what the situation looks like on the ground.

Camp Fire

California’s Deadly Wildfires
A rescue worker lifts a cadaver dog at the remains of a mobile home park destroyed by the Camp Fire in Paradise, California on November 14, 2018.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
San Francisco firefighters dismantle a burned mobile home in Paradise, California on November 14, 2018.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

E. Joaquin Esquivel@ejesquivel

As harmful to health and distracting as the smoke is, it’s what the smoke embodies–the painful and tragic loss of life, homes, communities, and place–that weighs the most.

See E. Joaquin Esquivel’s other Tweets

California’s Deadly Wildfires
The Gold Nugget Museum is shown totally demolished by the Camp Fire on November 13, 2018.
 Martha Mendoza/AP Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
The San Fransisco skyline is obscured by wildfire smoke and haze on November 12, 2018.
 Eric Risberg/AP Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A couple embraces while searching through the remains of their home in Paradise, California on November 12, 2018.
 Noah Berger/AP Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
Smoke lingers through the valley near Skyway in Chico, California on November 11, 2018.
 Mason Trinca/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Evan Sernoffsky 🥃

@EvanSernoffsky

Emotional moments reporting on the . @sfchronicle photographer @jachristian embraces elderly survivor who miraculously made it through firestorm

212 people are talking about this

California’s Deadly Wildfires
The Camp Fire burns in the hills on November 11, 2018, near Oroville, California.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
California’s Deadly WildfiresCalifornia’s Deadly WildfiresCalifornia’s Deadly WildfiresCalifornia’s Deadly Wildfires

Carolyn Cole@Carolyn_Cole

The has been the most destructive fire in history, killing more than 23 people and burning thousands of homes. The fire continued to advance on Sunday, Nov.11. @latimes.

150 people are talking about this

California’s Deadly Wildfires
Power lines rest on cars that were burned by the Camp Fire on November 10, 2018 in Paradise, California.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
Yuba and Butte County sheriff deputies carry a body bag with a deceased victim of the Camp Fire on November 10, 2018, in Paradise, California.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A firefighter looks down as a the wall of a burning home in Paradise, California falls next to him on November 9, 2018.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A California Highway Patrol vehicle mans a checkpoint along Highway 32 as the Camp Fire burns in the area on November 9, 2018.
 Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Woolsey Fire

California’s Deadly Wildfires
A burned car is seen off Mulholland Highway in the Santa Monica Mountains on November 14, 2018.
 David McNew/AFP/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A section of Mulholland Highway was completely destroyed. Taken November 14, 2018.
 David Crane/Digital First Media/Los Angeles Daily News/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
The Santa Monica Mountains are blackened by the Woolsey Fire near Malibu, California on November 14, 2018.
 David McNew/AFP/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
Roger Kelton searches through the remains of his mother-in-law’s home in Agoura Hills, California on November 13, 2018.
 Jae C. Hong/AP Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A family returns to the remains of their home to find family photographs on Busch Drive in Malibu, California on November 13, 2018.
 AFP/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
Firefighters work to contain the Woolsey Fire near Malibu, California on November 12, 2018.
 Ronen Tivony/NurPhoto/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A firefighting DC-10 drops fire retardant the mountains in Malibu, California on November 11, 2018.
 Richard Vogel/AP Images
California’s Deadly WildfiresCalifornia’s Deadly WildfiresCalifornia’s Deadly Wildfires

Los Angeles County

@CountyofLA

Heroes. These images by @LACoFDPIO photographers show frontline efforts now underway.

2,788 people are talking about this

California’s Deadly Wildfires
Firefighters battle a flare up of the Woolsey Fire in West Hills, California on November 11, 2018.
 September Dawn Bottoms/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
Satellite imagery shows the Woolsey Fire burning west of Los Angeles, California on November 11, 2018.
 DigitalGlobe/Getty Images

California’s Deadly Wildfires

Jon Passantino

@passantino

Was just sent this video from the Seminole Springs mobile home park in Malibu. Most got out with “just the shirt on their backs.” Now they’ve lost count after seeing more than 100 structures destroyed by the . 📷: Eric Videgain

506 people are talking about this

California’s Deadly Wildfires
These are the remains of a beachside luxury home along the Pacific Coast Highway community of Point Dume in Malibu, California, on November 11, 2018.
 Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
This photo taken on November 11, 2018, shows a charred cactus field in Malibu, California after the Woolsey Fire swept through it. 
September Dawn Bottoms/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A wildfire burns at the Salvation Army Camp on November 10, 2018 in Malibu, California.
 Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A helicopter drops flame retardant chemicals on the wildfire on November 10, 2018, in Malibu, California.
 Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
A table and chairs stand outside a destroyed home in Malibu, California, on November 10, 2018.
 Reed Saxon/AP Images
California’s Deadly Wildfires
Embers falls from burning palms as flames close in on a house at the Woolsey Fire on November 9, 2018, in Malibu, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

TAGS : california wildfires, deadly willdfires california

ALSO CHECK: Photos Of London’s Isle Of Dogs, Before The Big Money


Also published on Medium.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *